Category Archives: Myford Touch

Enhanced Trip Meter

Nearing the end of my series on the dashboard (maybe one or two more) we come to the “Enhanced Trip Meter”:

You turn this on by using the left arrow pad on the steering wheel, select “trip 1 & 2” then press the right arrow. From the menu that appears select “Enhanced”.

Ford has a brief video on the trip meters:

Its a good idea to use one of the trip meters to watch the battery: Reset it every time you charge to full. The total kWh value shown will give you a good idea of how much you have left (more than just the % value shown everywhere). The FFE has about 18.5 kWh of usable battery charge thus comparing that with the kWh value in the trip meter is another decent estimate of power remaining (the kWh value in the trip meter will actually count down during brake regeneration).

The Wh/mi value shows the average Wh/mi consumption since you reset the meter and is a good way to judge how efficient you’re driving. In the above image 240 Wh/mi is really good for my FFE in the dead of winter. Typically when I have to use the heat the value will be 300 Wh/mi or higher (in one instance it was really cold out and I was driving on the highway into the wind it read over 400 Wh/mi). In the summer months it is not uncommon to see values in the 220s range or lower depending on the roads driven.

For those people who like hard numbers and not pretty graphs the enhanced trip meter provides plenty of engineering eye candy.


Budget + Avg

By far the most used and popular dash view/configuration (at least within the myfocuselectric forums) is using MyView showing the climate and “other” current power consumption combined with the Budget + Avg item on the right. I’ve mentioned this display in my “What your dashboard can tell you” post.
The view looks like this:

Ford has a video about how to configure MyView:


(This is the same video I posted in the Range View post.)

This view gives you the most information available about power consumption in the car. The climate graph shows how much power (kW) that the HVAC is currently using (on a cold winter day running the heat will frequently peg this graph). “Other” shows everything else: rear defroster, headlights, radio, seat heat, etc. I don’t think I’ve ever seen “other” go above a tick or two.

Below the two graphs is the usual budget and status values showing the range at start (budget) and the difference between the current calculated range and range at start (status). More explanation of budget/status can be found here.

To the right of those is the infamous “blue cup” (discussed at length here). This gauge is showing three values simultaneously: Budget, instant consumption, and average consumption all in Wh/mile x100. The budget is represented by the blue cup. Instant consumption is the white line and finally average consumption is the two white tick marks. The basics of this display: If you can keep the two white tick marks (average consumption) at or below the top of the blue cup then you will make the budgeted range. If the tick marks fall significantly below the top of the cup you’ll go much farther than the budgeted range. If you’re really driving bad/aggressively and the tick marks are above the blue cup you will not be able to go as far as the budgeted range.

I can easily say that this display stays on my left side dash for a good 95% of my driving if not more (other than the past few weeks when I’ve been experimenting with different displays for these series of posts).


Energy History

Next up, the Energy History view:

I had wrote about this view earlier. Note that in that post I had about 5000 miles on the car, and in the above image I’m quickly approaching 20000 miles. Time flies when you’re having fun (although I don’t think my skills at capturing images from the dash have improved at all).

Ford even has a helpful video on the Energy History view:

Although their car is brand spanky new with only 147 miles on it!

The item that this view misses is the white tick marks on the “budget cup” at left showing your average power consumption. Those are the most useful of all the dash displays and are only available on one setting. Another thing I’d change to this view would be to add your average for the time period as its being calculated (shade inside the leftmost graph just like the 5 others but the height is the current minutes average) that way when they shift to the right you already know what the value is going to be.

I will frequently use this display with it set to 1 minute intervals as party of the configurable “MyView” shown in the image above. I find that the longer intervals are only useful if your trip is substantially longer than the total. With 1 minute intervals the display shows your power consumption over the past 5 minutes (2 minute intervals shows 10 minutes, etc.). The funny thing is that the white line shows you your “instant” power consumption: You can spend the whole minute keeping the white line below the blue cup and then see a yellow bar when it scrolls to the right–you could have a small instance of great power consumption that completely overrides the conservative driving for the rest of the minute.

A quick glance at this display shows how you’ve been doing for the past few minutes: If you see a lot of yellow you’re over budget, blue you’re good.


Range View

Now that I’m really comfortable driving the FFE around (I should be after a year and a half! LOL) I figure it might be a good time to produce a few articles on some of the different displays/gauges available on the FFE.

Today’s gauge is the “Range View” gauge:

This view can be shown on its own or as the left side of the MyView display. For more on MyView watch this Ford video:

Note that the MyView video above is pretty old and does show some “views” that are not currently available on the dash of the FFE’s MyView. In addition here is another Ford video discussing the range view:

A quick discussion on the FFE forums revealed what I had suspected: Almost nobody uses this gauge. The scaling of the numbers seems to enhance range anxiety rather than alleviate it (calling out the last 10 miles of the available range). In addition the view doesn’t seem like it would be very useful unless you frequently drove the car to less than 10 miles remaining. The display does graphically represent the two numbers shown below it (the budget and status, or distance to destination and surplus).

When you program in a destination on the Nav screen the range view switches (like the other displays on the FFE) to distance to destination and surplus. The switch does make the display marginally more effective.

I’ve been driving around with this gauge setup for the past few days. My impression has been that, for my commute where I don’t need Nav and I use less than 50% of the battery, it isn’t that useful. It was rather interesting the one time I used Nav with it watching the graph slide towards zero as I approached the destination (the only place in the car showing such a graph even though the numerical value is shown in 3 different places in the car!).


New Sync 3

Today Ford announced Sync version 3:

Ford today introduced Sync 3, the latest generation of its infotainment system that will debut on 2016 Ford and Lincoln models next year in a bid to win over critics who found past versions hard to use.

I’ve briefly played with the new system–or at least a very early version of it. It is very responsive and smartphone like (drag across the map to pan, pinch to zoom out, etc.). The article also mentions new features like the ability to download updates over a WiFi internet connection–a very handy feature. I’m not sure how many customers will go that route though as I’d bet there is a good number of MyFordTouch systems that have never been updated at all. Well at least the tech savvy customers will appreciate that.

As far as the FFE is concerned: I wouldn’t expect this to show up until at least the 2016 FFE at the earliest; perhaps even when the Focus redesign hits somewhere around 2017. We’ll see (it would be nice if it does make it to the 2016 as my lease will be up by then).


Hmm this is new

Well now this is something new that the car has decided to do.

The MyFord Touch system has had a very rocky history. Many people can’t stand it (with good reason), some people like it (I’m one of them). Regardless of where you stand it can get maddening from time to time when it doesn’t exactly work.

Recently the MFT in my FFE has started acting up. For some reason it just decides that I shouldn’t be listening to the radio so it shuts it off on me. It behaves exactly like I hit the power button: The display switches to the power off screen showing the button and the audio cuts out. I can hit the power button to turn it back on again but sure enough within a couple of minutes it shuts off again. So far in the 4 vehicles we have had with MFT we’ve never seen this kind of behavior.

To try to rectify the situation I’ve attempted:

  • Pulling fuse 67 (the sync module/MFT fuse) to reset it
  • Performed the master reset
  • Tried out every audio source to make sure it isn’t isolated to one

So far nothing has worked (switching to FM seemed to work but sure enough after about 10 minutes–long enough to make me think that it might work–it shut off). Sigh..I may now have my first issue with the car that I have to take it in for service… oh joy.

This doesn’t appear to be a mechanical thing like a loose wire: It has happened at stoplights when the car wasn’t moving, and it only turns off the radio (if there was a loose wire in the power button I’d expect it to also power the radio on when it is off).

Update: Radio heal thyself. From what I’ve heard the issue was with a local radio station’s HD equipment and affected quite a few vehicles. They have apparently fixed their broadcast equipment. So no trips to the dealer for me.


Mixing it up a bit a little

For years I’ve had an iPhone, four of them to be exact. Yep I’m a “sheeple” as people like to say. Now I’ve never stood around in line in front of an Apple store to get my iPhone, I have for my iPad (Tip: Stand in line in front of the carriers store on launch day instead of an Apple store: The line is shorter–if there is one at all).

The iPhone and MyFord Touch is an interesting combination which works quite well even though there is some obvious overlap (Sync vs Siri). I even had an engineer working with Ford tell me that when designing Sync Ford makes sure that the iPhone works first and foremost. With each new version of MFT/Sync I’ve seen the performance improve and functionality with the phone get better–aside from Bluetooth capability (the earliest versions would attempt to scan the media on the phone via bluetooth and let you command songs “Play artist xyz”. It wasn’t very reliable, though, and Ford pulled that out).

Fast forward to this past weekend: Now that my 2 years has long been up I was looking for a replacement for my 4S. The current batch of new iPhones really don’t look to be much of an improvement over the old (I must be getting jaded to all the new “features”). In addition, ever since Google introduced “Google Now” I’ve been curious about it–a much better take on “intelligence” than anything in the fruity camp. Hence I’ve now switched over to a Galaxy S5 from my iPhone 4S.

Overall I’m pretty happy with the phone: Since I’ve never had an Android phone some of the quirks people talk about it in comparison with other Android phones I barely notice: Its all new to me. (I’m sure long about the 2nd or 3rd paragraph here you’re thinking “Wait I thought this was an EV blog??” Well it is and it isn’t: Its my EV blog, besides I’m getting to that..sort of–at least with respect to how MFT deals with the new phone).

Now I had to delete my old phone and add my new phone to MyFord Touch. All of that went pretty well. In addition the bluetooth connectivity appears to be the same between the two phones (other than the S5 beeping at me every time that Sync commands it to do something). USB connectivity, on the other hand, is a bit different: When you connect an iPhone up to MFT via USB cable MFT scans the phone for all the media (in my case this would take a good 5-10 minutes) and then allow the full range of voice commands (“Play artist abc”, “Play song xyz”, “Play playlist pdq”, or even better, just “Play <something>” LOL).

For the S5: The first thing MFT said when I plugged it in via USB is “This device isn’t supported….”. Then it started playing some music it found on the device: The S5 appears to MFT like a big flash drive so MFT just scanned the drive and started playing what it found. This included a few ringtones that I had copied over and a podcast I had downloaded–but no music. Even funnier: Running Google’s music app proceeded to play music out of the phone’s speakers while MFT was playing the ringtones out of the car’s speakers LOL! At least I could switch back to bluetooth mode and get Google Music to play out of the car’s speakers.

The above results are just from experimenting a little bit with the phone in the car. Some of this makes sense as the S5 has only been out in the US market for a month or two and MFT hasn’t been updated since last year–it isn’t going to know about any of the new phones. Now its time to start Googling for other people’s experiences…


How far can I go part II–using the car

How often do you use the Navigation system on the FFE? Probably not often. After all you can only go 70+ miles or so on a charge right? In addition you pretty much know your neighborhood and where you drive it (it is a commuter car…).

Even if you have used the nav system you probably have only set a single destination: “Take me home”. There are other buttons on the screen:
Nav screen

Ever wonder what that “Set as Waypoint” button does? Try it. Pressing that button takes you here:
Nav screen 2

You can use this screen to add in a bunch of stops to your route. You can indicate at each stop weather or not you’ll be charging. You can use this screen to program in an entire route to see if you can make it on the current charge. If you tell the car that you’ll be charging only at the last stop that way when you start the route in the car the “status” value will indicate if you can make the route or not (a positive value for status means you’ll have extra miles available after the route, a negative value means you can’t make the route). You can even be sitting at “Home” and program in “Home” as the last stop for a round trip.

To add more stops simply press the “Add Waypoint” button at top left. When adding intermediate stops be sure to hit the “Set as Waypoint” button at the POI screen (seen above with the button circled). When adding the last point hit the “Set as Dest” button. To start using the route you’ve created press the “Compute Route” button at the lower left. This will bring you to the normal start navigation screen where it shows the different route options (shortest, fastest, etc.) where you can continue just like using a single point destination.


Resetting the budget…

I found out a way to reset the “budget” display (the budget indicator shows a miles to go value; I discussed it in detail in this post).

If you’re driving and decide that you don’t like the status indicator showing -100 miles (well ok that is a bit unrealistic: -10 is more like what you’ll see) you can reset the budget to what the current range is being shown. The trick is simply: set a navigation destination (with charging) and then cancel it. When the navigation is cancelled the budget will reset to whatever the current range is indicated on the battery display.

If you have “My Home” setup in MyFord Touch the quickest way to perform this operation is:

  • Press the Sync button
  • At the prompt say: “Navigation”
  • Next prompt: “Destination”
  • Next prompt: “Favorites”
  • The screen will show the favorites list say “Line 1” (that is always “My Home”–note since you’re talking you can do this while driving!)
  • The screen will eventually popup a question “Will you charge there”: press “Yes”
  • Press the “start route” button on the display

Note: You have to go through the “Favorite” route instead of simply saying “My Home” at that step because if you were to say “My Home” it would skip the “Charge at the destination?” question and assume No as an answer.

After a few seconds of chugging and calculating the route the nav display will show the route and the dash will switch to “charge point” and “surplus”. At this point press the sync button and say “Cancel Route” (it will ask an “are you sure” type question respond to that with “yes”).

Once the route has been cancelled on the left dash display you’ll see “budget set to xx” just like it did when you started the car. Now your status is back to zero!

Ok sure a long and convoluted method but it would appear to be the only way to reset the budget value (it may be quicker to just pull over and turn the car off and then back on again!). Now I’m not saying that the budget value is that important just how to reset it here.


Where ever you go; there you are.

One feature of the MyFord Touch (and MyLincoln Touch–forgot to mention that: anything that talks about MyFord Touch also applies to MyLincoln) that I use quite frequently and briefly touched on in my Tricks and Tips post is the ability to send a map destination to the car from a computer or smartphone. I find this feature useful enough that it needs its own how to do this post by itself…

First things first, though, before attempting any of this you need to have your cell phone and car “linked” up both using the bluetooth connection in the car and linked up on This is a separate website from the My Ford Mobile site Focus Electric users use to check their battery, remote start the car, etc. The syncmyride site is setup for all MyFord Touch owners to use for checking for updates, enabling sync services, scheduling service, etc. To use the download destination feature you need to be signed up for sync services and have your cell phone # registered on syncmyride.  The good news is that this setup is done only once so you can set it up and forget it (although you won’t want to completely forget it! LOL).

Now that you have sync services setup you can try it out: go out to the car, start it, press the sync button, and say “services”. The car will use your cell phone and dial into an 800 # at Ford. You’ll hear a similar voice to the sync voice–but this one is from a server through your phone–you can say: “traffic”, “weather”, “sports”, etc. to get various reports. (Since this service is through Ford instead of Sirius/XM you can still use this if your Sirius/XM account for the car expires–although I highly recommend keeping your Sirius/XM account subscribed.)

How to send a destination: I’m going to detail using MapQuest to send the destination to the car but you can also do this through the MyFord Mobile website or smartphone app.

On your computer browse to and enter in an address (for the purposes of this instruction I’ll use Joe Louis Arena’s address in Detroit):
Joe Louis Arena

To send the destination to the car click on the “Send” button at the top right. A drop down menu will appear: click on “Car”.
MapQuest Send Button
On the next window click on “Sync”:
MapQuest send to window
Finally enter in your cell phone # (the one registered to Sync Services) and (optionally) a name for the destination:
MapQuest send to phone

Now run out to your car, really it only works if you run! (ok just kidding you can take as long as you want. Sync services will remember the last destination sent to it until you download it into the car). In your car start it up and press the Sync button; at the prompt say “services”. When connected instead of asking for a command services will say: “MapQuest has sent you a waypoint to …. Do you wish to navigate there?” answer “yes” and wait about a minute while it downloads the destination. When it is done the phone will hang up, the right screen on the dash will say something like “destination downloaded” and the main MFT display will be on the navigation screen showing you the destination (don’t be concerned if the navigation screen labels the destination as “Street, City, State” look at the map it will be showing the proper location).

MFT display showing destination

Thats it; you can now hit “set as dest” on the screen (or press the sync button and say “set as dest”). Either way the car will take you there…

Note that on the Focus Electric after pressing “set as dest” the car will ask you if you will be charging the car at the destination. I find myself always answering “yes” to this question as I find the displays that show up when answering yes are quite useful.